e-book The Pill Problem: How to Protect Your Health from the Side Effects of Oral Contraceptives

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Book Review – The Pill Problem: How to Protect Your Health from the Side Effects of Oral Contraceptives by Ross Pelton, RPh, CCN. Written by.
Table of contents

The use of combined oral contraceptives COCs is proven to decrease the risk of two gynecological cancers ovarian and endometrial. It is difficult to know the effect of COC use on breast cancer and cervical cancer. The possibly increased risks that have been recorded in some studies are not large enough to outweigh benefits or to change current practice.

Information

Use of COCs helps protect women from two kinds of cancers—cancer of the ovaries and cancer of the lining of the uterus endometrial cancer. This protection continues for 15 or more years after stopping use.

Breast cancer Research findings about COCs and breast cancer are difficult to interpret. In studies, breast cancer is slightly more common among women using COCs and those who have used COCs in the past 10 years than among other women. Scientists do not know whether or not COCs actually caused the slight increase in breast cancers. Cervical cancer Cervical cancer is caused by certain types of human papillomavirus HPV.

Use of COCs for five years of more appears to speed up the development of persistent HPV infection into cervical cancer. The number of cervical cancers associated with COC use is thought to be very small. If cervical screening is available, providers can advise COC users—and all other women—to be screened every three years or as national guidelines recommend to detect precancerous changes in the cervix, which can be removed. A woman may experience short term side affects associated with use of combined oral contraceptive COCs , including changes in bleeding patterns, headaches, and nausea.

However such side effects are not a sign of illness, and usually stop within the first few months of using COCs. For a woman whose side effects persist, give her a different COC formulation. In women who are otherwise well, COC use may be continued for many years as there are no adverse effects related to long-term use. Some women who seek family planning are misinformed about how often or when they should take the pill. A woman can start using COCs any time she wants if she is reasonably certain that she is not pregnant. To be reasonably certain a client is not pregnant, providers can use the Pregnancy Checklist.

Informed consent: women need to know about the link between the pill and depression

If a client is starting her pack of pills within five days after the start of her menstrual period, there is no need for a backup method as she is immediately protected from pregnancy. If she starts COCs more than five days after the start of her menstrual period, she can start them any time it is reasonably certain she is not pregnant. She will need to use a "back up" method of contraception, such as a male or female condom, for the first seven days of taking pills to ensure protection from pregnancy. The effectiveness of oral contraception depends on a regular intake of the hormones contained in the pill.

Therefore pills must be taken daily, until the pack is empty. Although the specific time of day does not matter, the pills should be taken at the same time every day to reduce side effects and to help women remember to take their pills more consistently. The client should be advised not to interrupt taking the pills before a pack is finished, even if she does not have sexual intercourse.

Emergency contraception

If the pills are taken correctly, the client will always start a new pack on the same day of the week. If a client is taking pills from a pill pack, she will wait seven days after taking the last pill in the pack before beginning a new pack. If a client is taking pills from a pill pack, she will take the next pill from the next pack on the very next day. In the middle of the 20th century, oral contraceptives, commonly known as birth control pills or just "the pill" , began to be produced.

Over the last five decades, they have revolutionized women's health. Today, women around the world take different birth control pills to prevent pregnancy. These pills can be up to Birth control pills contain amounts of man-made estrogen and progestin hormones. There are many factors at play that prevent women from carrying a child.

The combination of hormones stops the body from ovulation. Hormonal contraceptives can also affect the lining of the uterus and make it difficult for an egg to be implanted. The most common birth control pills are the combination pills. They are a mix of estrogen and progestin hormones. Most of the combination pills come in day, day, or day packs.

Most pills in a pack are active, which means they contain hormones. These non-hormonal birth control pills also called placebo pills. Taking the placebo pills will result in a withdrawal bleed similar to period bleeding. Today, women can choose between different options, including regiments that are all active pills or regiments that are a mix of active pills and placebo or non-hormonal birth control pills. Set contraceptive pill reminders and track your cycle with maximum efficiency using our app for iOS or Android.

Download Flo today! These common birth control pills come packaged in a thin case.

Side effects

The case contains 21 active pills and 7 inactive pills. To remind you to take your pill every day, the pill packs are marked with the days of the week. Some pills have no non-hormonal birth control pills placebo or only two.


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Twenty-one-day pill packs contain 21 active pills. The day packs are extended-cycle pills. They are used in week cycles where you take active pills for 12 weeks. During the last week, you take the placebo pills or low-dose estrogen pills and have your period. Women who take these have their period only three to four times in a year. The progestin-only pills are common birth control pills that contain only one hormone progestin.

The mini pills come in a pack of 28, without a row of inactive or non-hormonal birth control pills.

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